lisboa: palácio da ajuda

Portugal, Lisboa, Palácio da Ajuda

When Pope Alexander III officially recognized Afonso Henriques as king in 1179, Portugal joined other prestigious royal houses in Europe. Dynasties would come & go—with several tragedies in between—but royalty ruled until the establishment of Portugal’s first republic in 1910. That span of 731 years gave Portugal much of its modern-day national heritage; however, unlike other European countries, royal palaces are not part of the main tourist circuit. Why not?

Continue Reading →

lisboa metro: linha vermelho tiles

Portugal, Lisboa, Metro, map, linha vermelho

Let’s continue our exploration of the Metro in the heart of the city. This was the first completely new line added to the existing Metro system, completed in 1998 to whisk visitors to & from the World Expo. A compass pointing east symbolizes the red line, at one time alternatively named the Linha do Oriente. The original section of the line—Alameda to Oriente—has been extended in both directions, & is an easy way to get from the airport to the city center…

Continue Reading →

lisboa metro: linha amarela tiles

Portugal, Lisboa, Metro, map, linha azul

Let’s continue our exploration of the Metro in the city center. Maybe check out the end of the aqueduct nearby or first have lunch at the fabulous, non-touristy Cervejaria Real Fábrica? Your choice. A sunflower symbolizes the yellow line, at one time alternatively named the Linha Girassol. Not many tourist sites are near this route—with the exception of the worthwhile Museu da Cidade in Campo Grande—so cars are more filled with locals & university students…

Continue Reading →